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What Should You Do If You Gave a Recorded or Written Statement To The Adjuster Early-on After The Accident?


SettlementCentral.Com tells you WHY and HOW to correct and supplement the recorded statement given to the insurance adjuster.
 
If you already gave a recorded statement to the insurance adjuster, all hopes are not lost. We can show how to limit the damages following your conversation with the insurance adjuster.
 
Here are the topics shown on the member's site:
 
Understand WHY it is important to know:
a) What you said
b) Why the insurance adjuster's record needs to be supplemented.
 
Get a copy of your statement or writing ASAP, irrespective of whether you are reading this one month or one year after giving the recorded or written statement.
 
Read or listen to it carefully, taking notes of points you think need correction or further explanation
 
  • Letter to adjuster requesting copy of recorded statement
  • Letter to adjuster confirming arrangements to record and furnish a copy of recorded statement
  • Letter to your state insurance commissioner
 
How to make the correction to your recorded or written statement.
 
Collect any applicable documentation, such as photos of the scene
 
Create your correction letter and send it in ASAP, irrespective of whether you are reading this one month or one year after giving the recorded or written statement-and be sure to send it even if you think the adjuster may discount it because it is coming in too late.
 
How to write the letter correcting or supplementing your recorded or written statement.
  • in the Case of a Motor Vehicle Accident
  • in the Case of a later-diagnosed case of TMJ
  • in the Case of a Dog Bite
  • in the Case of a Slip and Fall Accident
 
Here is a brief introduction to some of the topics on the member's site.
 
Understand WHY it is important to know:
a) what you said, and b) why the adjuster's record needs to be supplemented.

If you do decide to make a recorded statement for an adjuster, be sure to make arrangements to obtain a copy for your records. You will need it later on because you will not be able to remember details you told the adjuster, and you may have to explain your present position in light of a conflicting statement that you gave at the outset.
 
The adjuster has your information down in her file, and if you should later present something different in the claim (which is almost a certainty), you will have to explain why your circumstances have changed, or how your memory came to be "refreshed". In order to do that, you most certainly will need to make reference to the statement you gave at the outset.
 
Good demand letter preparation requires that you read or listen to your written or recorded statement, taking notes of points you want to raise in the demand letter, and of others that need correction or clarification. You will be surprised (and probably a little disappointed) to learn what you wrote or said when the accident was fresh and you had not lived with your injuries very long.
 
We have prepared easy correction instructions and letters for you to use in our members' area.
 
Get a copy of your statement or writing ASAP, irrespective of whether you are reading this one month or one year after giving the recorded or written statement.
It is NEVER TOO LATE to request a copy of your recorded statement; just be firm in your request, and do not feel as if you have to give any explanation whatsoever to request a copy.
 
How to make the correction to your recorded or written statement.
 
The first thing is to listen to the tape or read the transcript carefully, taking notes of points you think need correction or further explanation;
 
Second, collect any applicable documentation, such as photos of the scene that will help to explain why you are changing your story of what happened.
 
Send snail mail only-certified perhaps. Never do it via phone call or e-mail. The hard copy goes into your file and cannot be ignored. The hard copy carries more weight than a phone call or an e-mail.
 
How to write the letter correcting or supplementing your recorded or written statement.
 
You do not have to explain every little thing that is different these many months later; just focus on the bigger points. Too many attempts to correct or supplement or explain will not be credible. You probably get just a couple bites at that apple, so hit just the two most glaring items, and mention others just tangentially. We have prepared four correction letters on topics dealing with: motor vehicle accident, dog bite, slip and fall accident, and later-diagnosed TMJ.
 
Please see these letters at Correction and Supplementation Letter to Adjuster Regarding Recorded Statement
  • in the Case of a Motor Vehicle Accident
  • in the Case of a later-diagnosed case of TMJ
  • in the Case of a Dog Bite
  • in the Case of a Slip and Fall Accident