Early Treatment Helps Prove Your Injuries Were Caused by the Accident


 
Because of major changes in past decades, we live with a situation where some claimants have a real burden of proving the causal connection of their injury to the accident, the necessity of their medical treatment, and that their general damages (pain and suffering) exceed that predicted by the insurance industry computers, which will be based upon the cost and frequency of reasonable and necessary chiropractic treatments.
 
What does all this mean for you in the present-day claims environment? It means you must get medical treatment as soon as possible. You do not have the option of waiting around for a few days to see if the pain or dull ache that you noticed after the accident will go away. It may very well go away, but if you had any significant trauma at all, it is likely not going away any time soon. Instead you can expect that it will worsen. By the time you make it to the doctor, eight weeks after the accident, you may have a challenge tying your medical care and present condition to a remote accident date
 
Side Note: If you really have gone eight or ten weeks or more and have never seen a doctor, do not let this text discourage you from seeing a doctor or making a claim. However, unless you have a strong diagnosis on causation, this is an instance in which you may have to hire an attorney.
 
But, by all means, no matter how long you have waited, get to the doctor immediately. Don't suffer the "nobody would believe me now anyway, so I will just go without seeing a doctor" syndrome. Go now!! Even if your first visit is many weeks following the accident, a competent and caring doctor will take the time to help you by taking a comprehensive history and making a thorough examination. Doctors of Chiropractic understand soft tissue injury, and generally will do the best job in such circumstances of taking the time to listen to you, understanding your history and complaints, and making a thorough record, thereby tying the remote accident (in time, maybe three months ago) to their clinical examination results.